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Home > Health Library
Overview
Serrapeptase is a chemical taken from the silkworm. It is a commonly used drug (Takeda Chemical Industries) in Japan and Europe. In the U.S., serrapeptase is classified as a dietary supplement.
Serrapeptase is used for painful conditions including back pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, carpel tunnel syndrome, migraineheadache and tension headache.
It is also used for conditions that involve pain and swelling (inflammation) including sinusitis, laryngitis, sore throat, ear infections, swelling after surgery, swelling of a vein with the formation of a blood clot (thrombophlebitis), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.
Some people use serrapeptase for heart disease and “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis).
Women use it for non-cancerous lumpy breasts (fibrocystic breast disease), and nursing mothers use it for breast pain caused by too much milk (breast engorgement).

Other uses include treatment of diabetes, leg ulcers, asthma, and pus accumulation (empyema).
Serrapeptase helps the body break down protein. This might help decrease inflammation and mucous.


What is Serrapeptase ?
Serrapeptase, also known as serratio peptidase, is a proteolytic enzyme, which means its primary task is to break down proteins. This substance occurs naturally in the intestine of the silkworm and is used by the adult moth to dissolve the remains of the cocoon after metamorphosis takes place. As a supplement, serrapeptase is reputed to possess analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties.

How it is made?
Serrapeptase is isolated from any of a number of microorganisms belonging to the large family of bacteria known as Serratia sp. E-15, which includes Salmonella and Escherichia coli. According to an article in the September 2003 issue of "Life Extension" magazine, serrapeptase has been used medicinally in Europe and Asia for more than 25 years, where it is marketed under the trade names SerraZyme, Danzen and Aniflazym. In the U.S. serrapeptase has been sold as a dietary supplement since 1997.

Where it is found?
Serrapeptase is a proteolytic enzyme that is produced in a lab, but was first discovered in nature in the intestines of silkworms to aid in their digestion.

Benefits / uses
Serrapeptase is an enzyme that has been praised as an anti-inflammatory wonder. Originally found in the intestines of the silk worm, this enzyme is the focus of several independent studies the world over.

Circulation
This enzyme actually eats dead tissue. It is able to free blocked or clogged arteries by digesting the plaque coating the inner walls.

Chronic Ear Infections
Continued use helps reduce the risks of chronic ear infections. The enzyme reduces the pressure inside the ear, lessening the chances of infection.

Pain Relief
This enzyme has been used for mild to moderate pain. Headaches to backaches have shown improvement with daily use.

Anti-Inflammatory
The enzyme is best known for the ease it has provided sufferers of Crohn's disease and colitis. Lung conditions and sports injuries have also improved with its use.

Sinus Help
Conditions, such as sinusitis, have been helped by taking serrapeptase. Reportedly, sinus cavities have cleared and pressure has been known to dissipate with the use of the enzyme.

Arthritis Relief
Auto-immune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, are said to be relieved. In addition, lupus and multiple sclerosis symptoms have decreased.

Best Form For Human Consumption
Serrapeptase in Capsule or Tablet form.

Doses
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
For reducing swelling of the inside of the cheek after sinus surgery: 10 mg of serrapeptase 3 times on the day before surgery, once in the evening after surgery, and then 3 times daily for 5 days following surgery.

Possible Side effects / Precautions / Possible Interactions:
Serrapeptase seems to be safe for adults when taken by mouth, short-term (up to 4 weeks).

Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of serrapeptase during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Serrapeptase might interfere with blood clotting, so some researchers worry that it might make bleeding disorders worse. If you have a bleeding disorder, check with your healthcare provider before using serrapeptase.

Surgery: Serrapeptase might interfere with blood clotting. There is a concern that it might increase bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using serrapeptase at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Research studies / References
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Raskin JB. Gastrointestinal effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory therapy. Am J Med. 1999; 106 (5B):3S-12S.
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No author listed. Regular Use of Pain Relievers Can Have Dangerous Results. Kaleidoscope Interactive News, American Medical Association media briefing. July 24, 1997.
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Fung HB, Kirschenbaum, HL. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for the treatment of arthritis. Clin Ther. 1999; 21(7):1131-57.
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Geis GS. Update on clinical developments with celecoxib, a new specific COX-2 inhibitor: what can we expect? Scand J Rheumatol Suppl. 1999; 109:31-7.
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Cheatum DE, Arvanitakis C, Gumpel M, Stead H, Geis GS. An endoscopic study of gastroduodenal lesions induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Clin Ther. 1999; 21(6):992-1003.
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Tibble JA, Sigthorsson G, Foster R, Scott D, Fagerhol MK, Roseth A, Bjarnason I. High prevalence of NSAID enteropathy as shown by a simple faecal test. Gut. 1999; 45(3):362-6.
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Dingle JT. The effects of NSAID on the matrix of human articular cartilages. Z Rheumatol. 1999; 58(3):125-9.
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Murphy PJ, Badia P, Myers BL, Boecker MR, Wright KP Jr. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect normal sleep patterns in humans. Physiol Behav. 1994; 55(6):1063-6.
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Metz SA, Robertson RP, Fujimoto WY. Inhibition of prostaglandin E synthesis augments glucose-induced insulin secretion in cultured pancreas. Diabetes. 1981; 30(7):551-7.
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Marriott C. Modification in the rheological properties of mucus by drugs. Adv Exp Med Biol. 1982; 144:75-84.
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Tokumine F, Sunagawa T, Shiohira Y, Nakamoto T, Miyazato F, Muto Y. Drug-associated cholelithiasis: a case of sulindac stone formation and the incorporation of sulindac metabolites into the gallstones. Am J Gastroenterol. 1999;94(8):2285-8.
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Jiang HK, Chang DM. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with adverse psychiatric reactions: five case reports. Clin Rheumatol. 1999;18(4):339-45.
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Fung HB, Kirschenbaum, HL. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for the treatment of arthritis. Clin Ther. 1999; 21(7):1131-57.
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FDA MedWatch: The FDA Medical Products Reporting Program. May 12, 1999. FDA Talk Paper.
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Moriya N, Nakata M, Nakamura M, Takaoka M, Iwasa S, Kato K, Kakinuma A. Intestinal absorption of serrapeptase (TSP) in rats. Biotechnol Appl Biochem. 1994; 20(Pt1):101-8.
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Miyata, K. Intestinal absorption of Serratia Peptidase. J Appl Biochem. 1980;2:111-16.
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Perna L. Osservazionl Clniche sui traitamento in osppio cleco con Serratio peptidasl nella neifre perenna naila ninite cronica nacutizzata con sinusopattia, nella bronchia cronica nacutizzata. Rlv Pat Clin Tuberc Penumol. 1985; 56:509-516.
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Mazzone A, et al. Evaluation of Serratia peptidase in acute or chronic inflammation of otorhinolaryngology pathology: a multicentre, double-blind, randomized trial versus placebo. J Int Med Res. 1990; 18(5):379-88.
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Aso T et al. Breast engorgement and its treatment: Clinical effects of Danzen an anti-inflammatory enzyme preparation. The world of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Japanese). 1981; 33:371-9.
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Esch PM, Gerngross H, Fabian A. Reduction of postoperative swelling. Objective measurement of swelling of the upper ankle joint in treatment with serrapeptase-a prospective study (German). Fortschr Med. 1989;107(4):67-8, 71-2.
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Kee WH, Tan SL, Lee V, Salmon YM. The treatment of breast engorgement with Serrapeptase (Danzen): a randomized double-blind controlled trial. Singapore Med J. 1989;30(1):48-54.
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Koyama A, Mori J, Tokuda H, Waku M, Anno H, Katayama T, Murakami K, Komatsu H, Hirata M, Arai T, et al. Augmentation by serrapeptase of tissue permeation by cefotiam (Japanese). Jpn J Antibiot. 1986; 39(3):761-71.
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Majima Y, Inagaki M, Hirata K, Takeuchi K, Morishita A, Sakakura Y. The effect of an orally administered proteolytic enzyme on the elasticity and viscosity of nasal mucus. Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1988;244(6):355-9.
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Brewer Science Library website. 1999.
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Tomoda K, and Miyatam K. Some information on the composition of trachael secretions before and after the administration of Danzen. Exper Ther. 1972; 477:9-16.
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Kase Y, et al. A new method for evaluating mucolytic expectorant activity and its application to two proteolytic enzymes, serratiopeptidase and seaprose. Arznelrnitteltorachung. 1982; 32:374-378.
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Selan L, Berlutti F, Passariello C, Comodi-Ballanti MR, Thaller MC. Proteolytic enzymes: a new treatment strategy for prosthetic infections? Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1993; 37(12):2618-21.
 
 
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