SUPPORT : 09821117009
paytm
 09821117009
Shopping Cart
Main Menu
Home > Health Library > Glisodin
Glisodin
Overview
GliSODin presents a radical new approach to antioxidant supplementation, one that is entirely different from supplementing with conventional dietary antioxidants, such as vitamins and minerals, to correct a deficiency. GliSODin activates the most powerful antioxidants known, the body’s own internal antioxidant defense system, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (Cat ) and Glutathione Peroxidase (Gpx).

GliSODin works by promoting our own, innate cellular antioxidant defense system, which differs from exogenous antioxidants that are obtained from dietary sources. The body’s antioxidant supply can be classified into two groups:

Dietary antioxidants, which are externally provided: certain foods are rich in antioxidant substances like vitamins A, C & E, minerals (selenium, zinc, copper and manganese) and other antioxidant agents, including the polyphenols found in grapes and green tea. These external antioxidants contribute to the antioxidant reserve yet play a secondary role to the body’s own antioxidants.

Enzymatic antioxidants, which are made by the body, thus internally provided: the internal
antioxidant defense system includes Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Catalase (Cat) and Glutathione Peroxidase (Gpx), which are the first, and most powerful, line of defense against oxidative stress. Enzymatic antioxidant levels decline with the normal aging process, exposure to the environment, and even to the pressures of daily life – all sources of oxidative stress.
 
GliSODin promotes the body’s production of the enzymatic antioxidants, including SOD, providing therapeutic benefits.

What is Glisodin?
GliSODin is clinically-proven dietary supplement ingredient that promotes the body’s natural antioxidant system. By combating oxidative stress, GliSODin helps provide real health benefits.

Benefits / uses
GliSODin is the first orally-effective SOD supplement
GliSODin helps protect against oxidative stress by promoting Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) to battle oxidative stress. SOD has a different mode of action than other antioxidants and vitamins. Called 'the enzyme of life' when first discovered in 1968, it is produced by the body and is the first antioxidant mobilized by the cell for defense. As a result, SOD is considered more powerful than antioxidant vitamins. SOD also activates the body's production of two other important antioxidants, Catalase and Glutathione Peroxidase.


GliSODin is proven to:
 
Promote the production of the body's own, natural antioxidants
Help maintain cellular health and protect against damage caused by oxidative stress
Support skin health against photo-oxidative stress
Support healthy immune function
Help reduce lactic acid buildup in humans under physical stress<
 
A newly published, three-year study with GliSODin supplementation showed significant benefits for cardiovascular health. GliSODin promoted arterial health and function compared to the control group as measured by the thickness of the participants' carotid arteries. Further, GliSODin significantly improved the antioxidant status and provided a reduction in measures of lipid oxidation. The researchers called the results "remarkable."

The body's own antioxidant defense system
If you are like most people, chances are you never knew the human body has its own built-in antioxidant defense system. In fact the body’s own antioxidants, including SOD, are by far the most important, providing the first line of defense against harmful oxidative stress. Unfortunately, aging, environmental factors and the stresses of daily life can diminish the levels of these important innate antioxidants.

Support skin health against photo-oxidative stress
GliSODin benefits protecting cells against oxidative stress are also supported by two preliminary studies looking at the effects of Ultraviolet Rays (UV) on the skin, inducing photo-oxidative stress.

The
first study was a randomized double-blind study with 50 participants. Using a UV light, researchers created photo-oxidative stress on the skin, causing a burn and measuring the change in the color of the skin (redness) on the inner-forearms of healthy subjects. They conducted the UV stress test before starting supplementation with 500 mg of GliSODin or placebo, and repeated it each week for four weeks during supplementation.

After using GliSODin, a significantly greater amount of UV exposure was required to create the redness and burn on the skin. This was not seen in the placebo group.

The researchers concluded that GliSODin appears to effectively help protect against oxidative stress resulting from exposure to the UV radiation, particularly for fair-skinned (phototype II) people.

The
second study was an open clinical trial conducted by 40 dermatologists in France. 150 volunteers where chosen based upon their susceptibility to flushing and burns and other oxidative stress reactions caused by exposure to the sun. The participants took 500mg of GliSODin daily over a 60 period, and did not change their sunbathing routine, including use of their regular sun screen (Index 20-100). This preliminary study suggests that the antioxidant properties of GliSODin may help support skin health against photo oxidation.

Support healthy immune function
Significant oxidative stress that is the result of the natural processes of aging, emotional stress and environmental exposure can diminish our antioxidant defense system.For example, individuals who have reduced levels of SOD, catalase and Gpx may have higher levels of free radicals.

A recent study showed marked improvement in individuals with reduced levels of our natural antioxidant defenses. GliSODin supplementation restored the natural antioxidant capacities to healthy levels, including SOD, Catalase and Gpx.

By elevating the levels to healthy ranges, GliSODin supplementation could help support the immune system and down-regulate oxidative stress. GliSODin helps promote healthy levels of our antioxidant defense system.


Help reduce lactic acid buildup in humans under physical stress
Exercise is another model for evaluating the effects of induced oxidative stress. Strenuous exercise abruptly increases oxygen consumption, aggravating oxidative stress by generation of free radicals.In one compelling study, healthy volunteers supplemented their diets with GliSODin. The participants underwent strenuous exercise before starting GliSODin at 1500mg daily, and after 4 weeks of supplementation. Several markers of oxidative stress where compared before and after, including total blood antioxidant levels and lactic acid accumulation.

GliSODin supplementation resulted in a significant positive change in oxidative status and a significant decrease in exercise-induced lactate release, suggesting that damage causing oxidative stress was significantly inhibited. These findings are supported by several in vivo and human studies.

 

Doses
1-2 capsules twice daily.

Additional supplementation can be taken for any strains on the body’s natural defense system: convalescence, intense exposure to the sun or ultra-voilet rays, stress, or intense physical exercise.

Possible Side effects / Precautions / Possible Interactions:
A small subset of population may be allergic to wheat protein. Anyone allergic to wheat protein should avoid all products that contain wheat protein. Glisodin is not meant to be used by preganant women and children below 12 years.

Reference & Research:

arw
P Humbert, “Could a photobiological test be a suitable method to assess the antioxidant effect of a nutritional supplement (GliSODin)?” The European Journal of Dermatology, vol 17 n° 3 May/June 2007
arw
M. Cloarec, et. al. “GliSODin, a Vegetal SOD with Gliadin, as Preventative Agent VS. Atherosclerosis, as Confirmed with Carotid Ultrasound-B Imaging,” European Annuals of Allergy & Clinical Immunology vol 39 no 2 2007
arw
Kick, et. al., "Effects of a cantaloupe melon extract/wheat gliadin (GliSODin®) biopolymer during aortic cross-clamping," Journal Intensive Care Medicine 10.1007/s00134-006-0518-6
arw
A Calenda, “Relationship between Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and GliSODin” Pharmaceutical Sciences, Angers, France, 2006
arw
P. Sicard, et. al., "Dietary Superoxide Dismutase Protects Against Light–Induced Retinal Oxidative Stress in Young Senescence Accelerated Mice (SAM)," Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2006;47: E-Abstract 2089
arw
F Okada, H Shionoya, M Kobayashi, T Kobayash, H Tazawa, K Onuma, Y Iuchi, N Matsubara, T Ijichi, B Dugas and M Hosokawa, "Prevention of inflammation- mediated acquisition of metastatic properties of benign mouse fibrosarcoma cells by administration of an orally available superoxide dismutase." British Journal of Cancer (2006) 94, 854-862
arw
Tkachenko E., Uspensky U., Avaluev E., Oreshko L., "Research of in-patient efficaciousness of the biologically active addition to f ood GliSODin in therapeutic practice," St. Petersburg State Medical Academy, St. Petersburg, Russia. 2005
arw
S. Arent, D. DiFabio, J. Greenwood, J. Pellegrino, C. Williams, "Nutritional Supplementation In Male College Soccer Players: Effects On PerformanceAnd Oxidative Stress," Human Performance Lab, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. 2005
arw
Rahman H., Rocco R., Tabassum V. “The effects of a specialized superoxide dismutase nutritional supplement for HIV patients on HAART” Center for Family of Health of St. Mary’s, Hoboken NJ. 2004 Contributed by Millennium Biotechnologies, Inc
arw
Naito, Y., et al. “Reduction of diabetes-induced renal oxidative stress by a cantaloupe melon extract/gliadin biopolymers, oxykine, in mice” Biofactors. 2005; 23:85-95.
arw
Jiang Yan Zhou, Patrice Prognon, “Raw material enzymatic activity determination: A specific cas e for validation and comparison of analytical methods—The example of superoxide dismutase (SOD)” Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis 18 March 2006;1143 -1148
arw
J Menvielle-Bourg, “Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), a Powerful Antioxidant, is now Available Orally” Phytothérapie (2005) Numéro 3: 118-121
arw
Mac-Mary, J. Sainthillier, P. Creidi, J.P. Series, F. Vix, Ph. Humbert, “Evaluation of the Effect of GliSODin on the Intensity of Actinic Erythema,” presented at the CARD (Annual Congress of Dermatological Research) meeting in Brest, France, May 28th 2005
arw
“GliSODin TRIAL,” an open study conducted in France on 15 patients presenting fragile skin, hypersensitivity to the sun or even problems of sun disease, conducted by Catherine LAVERDET, MD, Dermatologist, Attachée de Consultation des Hôpitaux de, Paris. July-September 2003
arw
“GliSODin and Exposure to the Sun,” an open study conducted in France on 150 patients by 40 dermatologists following a protocol compiled by Catherine Laverdet, M.D., Nadine Pomarede, M.D. and Catherine Oliveres-Ghouti, M.D. Sponsored by ISOCELL Nutra,France. March 2005
arw
M. Albicini, J. Kick, B. Hauser, U. Ehrmann, X. Leverve, P. Radermacher, G. Speit, C.M. Muth “The Orally Effective Mixture of Sod and Gliadin (GliSODin®) Pr otects Against Oxidative DNA Damage,” presented at the 11th Congress of the European Shock Society January 27-30, 2005
arw
Y. Hong, S. Hong, Y.H. Chang. S.H. Cho. “Influence of an orally effective superoxie dismutase (glisodin) on strenuous exercise induced changes of blood antioxidant enzymes and plasma lactate,” presented at the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) National Meeting, July 2004
arw
H. Chenal, A. Davit-Spraul, J. Brevet, A. Legrand, J. Demouzon, C. Cosson. B. Dugas, L. Montagnier, M. Conti. “Restored antioxidant circulating capacities in AIDS west african patients receiving an antioxidant nutraceutical Cucumis melo extract rich in superoxide dismutase activity,” 2006 (Abstract included at the XVI International AIDS Conference Aug 2006)
arw
C. Muth, Y. Glenz, M. Klaus, P. Radermacher, Guenter Speit, X. Leverve. “Influence of an orally effective SOD on hyperbaric, oxygen related cell damage,” Free Radical Research 38:9 (2004) pp. 927-932
arw
Vouldoukis, M. Conti, P. Krauss, C. Kamate, S. Blazquez, M. Tefit, D. Mazier, A. Calenda, B. Dugas. “Supplementation with gliadin-combined plant superoxide dismutase extracts promotes antioxidant defenses and protects against oxidative stress,” Phytotherapy Res Mar 1;18(12) (2004) 957-962
arw
Kramer, H. Dijkstra, A. Bast. “Control of physical exercise of rats in a swimming basin,” Physiol Behavior.(1993) Feb;53(2):271-6
arw
Wozniak, G. Drewa, G.Chesy, A. Rakowski, M. Rozwodowka, D. Olszewska. “Effect of altitude training on the peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in sportsmen,” Medical Science Sports Exercise (2001) Jul;33(7) 1109-13
arw
Marzatico, O. Pansarasa, L. Bertorelli, L. Somenzini, G. Della Valle. “Blood free radical antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxides following long-distance and lactacidemic performances in highly-trained aerobic and sprint athletes,” Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness.(1997) Dec. 37(4) 235-9
arw
Marikovsky, V. Ziv , N. Nevo. C. Harris-Cerruti, O. Mahler. “Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase plays important role in immune response,” J. Immunology.(2003) Mar 15;170(6):2993-3001
arw
Gow, H. Ischiropoulos. “Super-SOD: superoxide dismutase chimera fights off inflammation,” American Journal Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. (2003) June; 284(6):L915-6
arw
VL. Kinnula, JD. Crapo. “Superoxide dismutases in the lung and human lung diseases,” American Journal Respiratory Critical Care Medicine.(2003) Jun 15;167(12):1600-19
arw
Vouldoukis, V. Sivan, M.C. Vozenin, C. Kamate, A. Calenda, D. Mazier, B. Dugas. “Fc-receptor-mediated intracellular delivery of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) protects against redox-induced apoptosis through a nitric oxide dependent mechanism,” Molecular Medicine. (2000) 6 (12) 1042
arw
Vouldoukis, D. Lacan, C. Kamate, P. Coste, A. Caldnda, D. Mazier, M. Conti, B. Dugas. “Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of a Cucumis melo extract rich in superoxide dismutase activity,” J.Ethnopharmacology. 94 (2004) 67-75
arw
Y. He, R. Vemulapalli, GG Schuring “Recombinant Ochrobactrum anthropiexpressing Brucella abortus Cu, ZN superoxide dismutase protects mice against B. abortus infection only after switching of immune responses to Th1 type,” Infection and Immunity.(2002) May 70(5) 2535-43
arw
Dugas, N. Dugas, M. Conti, A. Calenda, P. Pino, Y. Thomas, D. Mazier, I. Vouldoukis. “Wheat gliadine promotes the Interleukin-4 induced IgEproduction by normal human peripheral mononuclear cells througha redox dependent mechanism,” Cytokine 21, (2003)1-11
arw
Vouldoukis, M. Conti, JP. Kolb, A.Calenda, D. Mazier, B. Dugas. “Induction of Th1- dependant immunity by an orally effective melon SOD extract,” Research Trends, in Current Trends in Immunology,” 5, (2003) 141-145
arw
Dugas, A. Mercenier, I. Lenoir-Wijnkoop, C. Arnaud, N. Dugas, E.Postaire. ”Immunity and probiotics,” Immunolgy Today (1999) Sept. 20 (9) 387-90