SUPPORT : 09821117009
paytm
 09821117009
Shopping Cart
Main Menu
Home > Health Library > Wheat grass
Wheat grass
Overview
Wheatgrass is a kind of grass. The above-ground parts, roots, and rhizome are used to make medicine. Wheatgrass is primarily used as a concentrated source of nutrients. It contains vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E, iron, calcium, magnesium, and amino acids.

Wheatgrass is used for increasing production of hemoglobin, the chemical in red blood cells that carries oxygen; improving blood sugar disorders, such as diabetes; preventing tooth decay; improving wound healing; and preventing bacterial infections.

It is also used for removing deposits of drugs, heavy metals, and cancer-causing agents from the body; and for removing toxins from the liver and blood.

Some people use wheatgrass for preventing gray hair, reducing high blood pressure, improving digestion, and lowering cholesterol by blocking its absorption.

Wheatgrass is also used to treat various disorders of the urinary tract, including infection of the bladder, urethra, and prostate; benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH); kidney stones; and in "irrigation therapy," the use of a mild diuretic along with lots of fluids to increase urine flow.

Other uses include treatment of respiratory tract complaints, including the common cold, cough, bronchitis, fever, and sore throat; tendency toward infection; gout; liver disorders; ulcerative colitis; joint pain; and chronic skin problems.

Wheatgrass is used for cancer and arthritis in alternative treatment programs. Wheatgrass contains a lot of chlorophyll, the chemical in plants that makes them green and also allows them to make energy from sunlight through photosynthesis. Some people think chlorophyll might fight cancer and arthritis.
Wheatgrass juice is a popular health drink. It is thought to benefit health only when fresh and taken on an empty stomach immediately after extraction. In foods and beverages, wheatgrass extracts are used as a flavoring component.


What is Wheat Grass?
Wheat grass is the young grassy plant that grows to yield wheat grain. Known as one of the "green foods" along with barley grass, spirulina, chlorella, oat grass and alfalfa, wheat grass is valued as a health supplement for its rich nutrient content. Chlorophyll is a green pigment found in plants and green algae that allows sunlight to be converted to energy.
arw 30mls of freshly squeezed wheatgrass juice is equivalent in nutritional value to 1kg of leafy green vegetables
arw Wheatgrass contains over 90 minerals, including high concentrations of the most alkaline minerals: potassium, calcium, magnesium and sodium
arw It contains the essential enzymes: Protease (assists in protein digestion), Cytochrome Oxidase (a powerful anti oxidant), Amylase (facilitates digestion), Lipase (a fat splitting enzyme), Transhydrogenase (strengthens the heart muscle) & Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) (found in all body cells and is known for its ability to lessen the effect of radiation and slow cellular aging)
arw Just one teaspoon of Wheat Grass powder, weighing a mere 3.5 grams, is nutritionally equal to an entire spinach salad weighing a full 50 grams – it packs a punch.
arw Wheatgrass has more vitamin C than oranges and twice the vitamin A as carrots!
arw Wheat grass juice helps your body to build red blood cells which carry oxygen to every cell. By increasing the oxygenation the body you can help offset smog and carbon monoxide and increase your endurance during physical exercise
arw It also contains 19 amino acids, the building blocks of protein.
 
Benefits / uses
Wheatgrass Builds Blood: Many health experts have highlighted that the chlorophyll molecule in wheatgrass is almost identical to the haemoglobin molecule in human blood. The only difference is that the central element in chlorophyll is magnesium and in haemoglobin it is iron.

Due to this inherent similarity the human body can easily transform chlorophyll into haemoglobin increasing the red blood cell count as well as the blood’s capacity to deliver oxygen and other nutrients to the body’s cells.

Chlorophyll has been shown to build red blood cells quickly, normalise blood pressure by dilating the blood pathways though out the body, destroy poisonous carbon dioxide, release free oxygen and promote higher metabolism and stimulated enzyme systems. On top of all of these benefits, consuming chlorophyll from wheatgrass is a highly effective way to alkalise the blood and energise the body!

Wheatgrass Cleanses the Body: Wheatgrass is an extremely beneficial food in terms of both its cleansing capabilities. The contents of wheatgrass juice and powder are reported to be within the region of approximately 100 separate elements with scientists dubbing it a ‘complete food’. According to ‘The Wheatgrass Book’ (Wigmore, 1985), just 140g of fresh wheatgrass offers the same nutritional value as over 3kg’s of fresh green vegetables!

Wheatgrass is a great source of vitamins B, C, E and carotene which are hugely effective in destroying and eliminating free radicals and cleansing the body. Wheatgrass is also highly regarded for its ability to cleanse the blood, organs and gastrointestinal tract.

Because it is also high in saponin, wheatgrass offers excellent support to the lymphatic system, helping to carry away hundreds and thousands of toxins from the cells of the body. Wheatgrass helps to detoxify the body by increasing the elimination of hardened mucous, crystallised acids and solidified, decaying faecal matter.It is the fastest, surest way to eliminate internal waste and provide an optimum nutritional environment.

Wheatgrass Has High Amino Acid Content: Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. They are absolutely essential to our growth and cell regeneration. It is the astonishingly high amino acid content in wheatgrass that is leading to many bodybuilders and gym-goers incorporating fresh or powdered wheatgrass juice into their daily routine.

Wheatgrass juice is a complete protein and contains, amongst others, the following amino acids: arginine, serine, absenisic, lysine, aspartic acid, glycine, alanine, methionine, leucine, tryptophane, phenylalanine, and valine.

Wheatgrass Fights and Protects against Illness: Organic wheatgrass powders and juices are an extremely effective way of boosting the body’s immune system to fight against and recover from illnesses and ailments. Wheatgrass is a great source of beta carotene, contains most of the B vitamins and vitamins C, E, H and K, and also contains over 90 different minerals and 19 amino acids. It also contains several active enzymes which play a major role in breaking down fats, undertaking biological functions and assist hugely in weight loss. Of the 90 minerals found, many of these are very alkalising and include calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium and iron.

Cchlorophyll content of wheatgrass protects the body from carcinogens more effectively than any other food. Studies have shown that wheatgrass consumption has reduced the absorption of a number of very serious carcinogens whilst strengthening cells, detoxifying the liver and neutralising polluting elements within the blood.


Best Form For Human Consumption
Wheat grass is available in powder, tablet, juice or live grass form. Wheat grass is often available in combination with barley grass, spirulina, chlorella, oat grass or alfalfa.

Doses
The appropriate dose of wheatgrass depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions

Possible Side effects / Precautions / Possible Interactions:
Wheatgrass is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts and POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken in medicinal amounts for up to one month. Not enough is known about the safety of long-term use of wheatgrass as medicine.

Wheatgrass can cause nausea, appetite loss, and constipation.


Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of wheatgrass during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Research & References:
arw
Hughes and Letner. “Chlorophyll and Hemoglobin Regeneration,” American Journal of Medical Science, 188, 206 (1936)
arw
.Patek. “Chlorophyll and Regeneration of Blood,” Archives of Internal Medicine. 57, 76 (1936)
arw
Kohler, Elvahjem and Hart. “Growth Stimulating Properties of Grass Juice,” Science. 83, 445 (1936)
arw
Kohler, Elvahjem and Hart. “The Relation of the Grass Juice Factor to Guinea Pig Nutrition.” Journal of Nutrition, 15, 445 (1938)
arw
Rhoads. “The Relation of Vitamin K to the Hemorrhagic Tendency in Obstructive Jaundice (Dehydrated Cereal Grass as the Source of Vitamin K). Journal of Medicine, 112, 2259, (1939)
arw
Waddall. “Effect of Vitamin K on the Clotting Time of the Prothrombin and the Blood (Dehydrated Cereal Grass as the Source of Vitamin K).” Journal of Medicine. 112, 2259 (1939)
arw
Illingworth. “Hemmorrhage in Jaundice (Use of Dehydrated Cereal Grass).” Lancet. 236. 1031 (1939)
arw
Kohler, Randle and Wagner. “The Grass Juice Factor.” Journal of Biological Chemistry. 128, 1w (1939)
arw
Friedman and Friedman. “Gonadotropic Extracts from Green Leaves.” American Journal of Physiology. 125, 486, (1939)
arw
Randle, Sober and Kohler. “The Distribution of the Grass Juice Factor in Plant and Animal Materials.” The Journal of Nutrition. 20, 459 (1940)
arw
Gomez, Hartman and Dryden. “Influence of Oat Juice Extract Upon the Age of Sexual Maturity in Rats. The Journal of Dairy Science. 24, 507 (1941)
arw
Miller. “Chlorophyll for Healing.” Science News Letter. March 15, 17l (1941)
arw
Gomez. “Further Evidence of the Existence and Specificiey of an Orally Active Sex Maturity Factor (s) in Plant Juice Preparations.” The Journal of Dairy Science. 25, 705 (1942)
arw
Kohler. “The Effect of Stage of Growth on the Chemistry of the Grasses.” The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 215-23 (1944)
arw
Boehme. “The Treatment of Chronic Leg Ulcers with Special Reference to Ointment Containing Water Soluble Chlorophyll.” Cahey Clinical Bulletin. 4, 242 (1946)
arw
Bowers. “Chlorophyll in Wound Healing and Suppurative Disease.” The American Journal of Surgery. 71, 37 (1947)
arw
Colio and Babb. “Study of a New Stimulatory Growth Factor,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, 174, 405 (1948)
arw
Juul-Moller and Middelsen. “Treatment of Intestinal Disease with Solutions of Water Soluble Chlorophyll.” The Review of Gastroenterology. 15, 549 (1948)
arw
Carpenter. “Clinical Experiences with Chlorophyll Preparations with Particular Reference to Chronic Osteomyelitis and Chronic Ulcer.” American Journal of Surgery. 77, 267 (1949)
arw
Offenkrantz. “Water-Soluble Chlorophyll in Ulcers of Long Duration.” Review of Gastroenterology, 17, 359-67 (1950)
arw
Anselmi. “Clinical Use of Chlorophyll and Derivatives.” (??H or M) Minerva Medica. 2, 1313-14 (1950)
arw
.Lam and Brush. “Chlorophyll and Wound Healing: Experimental and Clinical Sudy,” American Journal of Surgery. 80, 204-20 (1950)
arw
Granick. “Structural and Functional Relationships between Heme and Chlorophyll.” The Harvey Lectures. (1943-l949)
arw
Cheney. “Antipeptic Ulcer Dietary Factor.” The Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 26, 668 (1950)
arw
Cheney. “The Nature of the Antipeptic Ulcer Factor.” Stanford Medical Bulletin, 8, 144 (1950)
arw
Sonsky. “Vitamin K Influence of Preventative Prenatal Administration,” Ceskolovenska Gyneakologia, 29, 197 (1950)
arw
Mossberg. “Vitamin K Treatment of Acute Hepatitus.” British Medical Journal. 1, 1382-84 (1961)
arw
Reid. “Treatment of Hypoprothrombinemia with Orally Administered Vitamin K.” Quarterly Bulletin: Northwestern University Medical School. 25. 292-95 (1951)
arw
Dohan, Richardson, Stribley and Gyorgy. “The Estrogenic Effects of Extracts of Spring Rye Grass.” Journal of the American Veterinary Medicine Association. 118, 323 (1951)
arw
Kohler and Graham. “A Chick Growth Factor Found in Leafy Green Vegetation,” Poultry Science. 30, 484 ((1951)
arw
Paloscia and Pallotta. “Chlorophyll in Therapy.” Lotta Controlla Tubercolosi, 22, 738-40 (1952)
arw
Shattan and Kutcher. “Effect of Chlorophyll on Postextraction Healing.” Journal of Oral Surgery. 46, 324 (1952)
arw
Kutcher and Chilton. “Clinical Use of Chlorophyll Dentifrice.” Journal of the American Dental Association. 46, 420-22 (1953)
arw
Kohler. “The Unidentified Vitamins of Grass and Alfalfa.” Feedstuffs Magazine. August 8 (1953).
arw
Dunham. “Differential Inhibition of Virus Hemagglutination by Clorophyllin.” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. 87, 431-33 (1954)
arw
Gandolfi. “Repitelizing Potency Exerted on Cornea by Chlorophyll.” Annali de Ottalmologiale Clinica Oculistica. 80, 131-42 (1954)
arw
Borelli. “Chlorophyll (for Acne Therapy). Der Hautarzt. 6, 120-24 (1955)
arw
Gandolfo. “Antismotic Activity of Chlorophyllin.” Rendiconti Instituto Superiore de Sanita. 18, 641-48 (1955)
arw
Offenkrantz. “Complete Healing (Peptic Ulcer) with Water-Soluble Chlorophyll.” American Journal of Gastroenterology. 24, 182-85 (1955)
arw
Wennig. Modification and Inhibition of Resorption of Urinary Substances with Chlorophyllin,” Wiener Medizinishe Wochenschrift. 105, 885-87 (1955)
arw
Ammon and Wolfe. “Does Chloro;hyll have Bactericidal and Bacteriostatic Activity?” Arzneimettel-Forschung. 5, 312-14 (1955)
arw
Bertram and Weinstock. “A Clinical Evaluation of Chlorophyll, Benzocain and Urea Ointment in Treatment of Minor Infections of the Foot.” Journal of the American Podiatry Association. 19, 366 (1959)
arw
The Scandanavian Journal of Gastroenterology, Volume 37, Number 4/April 1, 2002, pages 444-449 talks of a study titled: "Wheat Grass Juice in the Treatment of Active Distal Ulcerative Colitis: A Randomized Double-blind Placebo-controlled Trial." Conclusion: "Wheat grass juice appeared effective and safe as a single or adjuvant treatment of distal UC."